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Friday
May172019

Podcast #896: Best Overall 4K TV

We get asked what’s the best TV I can buy from time to time and we always reply with, “That depends on what you want to use it for”. Few people have a specific purpose. Mainly it's for overall viewing. So when we ran across a page over at CNET that helps you select the best TV we thought it would be great to share it with all of our listeners.

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Best Overall 4K TV

We get asked what’s the best TV I can buy from time to time and we always reply with, “That depends on what you want to use it for”. Few people have a specific purpose. Mainly it's for overall viewing. So when we ran across a page over at CNET that helps you select the best TV we thought it would be great to share it with all of our listeners.

CNET’s Best TVs for 2019 allows the reader to filter their reviews based on criteria that is important to the reader. You can look at TVs based on Picture Quality, LED, 4K, or Size. For today we will look at CNET’s best overall TVs for 2019. We’ll link to the full review for each TV.

Best High End TV for the Money - LG OLEDB8P series 65” $2,500 

OLED TVs are the picture quality kings, and this is the 2018 OLED TV to buy. Its image quality is very close to the C8 and C9 (below) and while it's cheaper than either one, it's still an expensive TV. (Full Review)

Editor’s Rating 8.7

Design 9

Features 10

Performance 10

Value 6

Best TV for the Money Period - TCL 6 series (2018 Roku TV) 65” $800 

No TV we've ever tested offers this much picture quality for this little cash, and its Roku TV operating system is our hands-down favorite. The TCL 6 series wins the value race. (Full Review)

Editor’s Rating 8.6

Design 7

Features 9

Performance 8

Value 10

A Bit Better OLED Picture, A Bit More Money - LG OLEDC8P 65” $2,800 

A few hundred dollars more than the B8 gets you the C8 and its incrementally better image quality. It's a better value than the C9 below, so it gets a higher spot on this list. (Full Review)

Editor’s Rating 8.6

Design 9

Features 10

Performance 10

Value 6

The Picture Quality King by a Nose - LG OLEDC9PUA series 65” $3,500 

If you don't care about cost and just want the best picture, the C9 is the way to go. It barely beat the 2018 C8 and B8, but for now they're superior values -- almost as good and much less expensive. (Full Review)

Editor’s Rating 8.5

Design 9

Features 10

Performance 10

Value 5

Best OLED Alternative at 65 inches - Vizio P-Series Quatum 65” $1,250 

Vizio's best TV ever is only available in one size, but if you can't swing the price for an OLED TV and still want an amazing picture, it should be first on your list. (Full Review)

Editor’s Rating 8.3

Design 8

Features 9

Performance 9

Value 7

 

 

 

Download Episode #896

Reader Comments (1)

Hey guys - thanks again for your podcast, I’m a happy weekly listener and donate when I have the chance. This week you guys address a question re: sending the TV audio to headphones and I also had a little trouble fully understanding the setup - but recently I found myself watching TV late, too late to use the home theater at respectful volumes, and I found that I was able to send any audio signal going through my Yamaha RX-V681 to Bluetooth headphones by going to the Bluetooth menu and pairing the headphones to my receiver. Since all audio runs through the receiver anyways, I can use ARC to send the signal from my LG OLED to the receiver and then to my headphones. At that point, you can choose to turn your volume all the way down as I do when it’s late and still retain the ability to control the volume on my Bluetooth headphones, or in this case the user can still use the speakers at any desired volume while transmitting to the headphones. I may need to go back and listen again, but I couldn’t tell if the receiver in question had the option to pair / send the signal via Bluetooth. If so it could greatly reduce the wiring and avoid having to change the settings each time you want to listen to audio via Bluetooth headphones. Let me know what you think and if i missed anything in the equation. Thanks again!

May 23, 2019 | Unregistered CommenterAndrew Butler

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